Introduction to Objective-C Blocks

In programming, what differentiates a good developer from a great developer is the way each one takes advantage of the programming tools he or she offered by the used language. Objective-C, the official language for developing applications for iPhone, iPad and Mac OS, is a multi-featured one, and as a relative to C, very powerful. New developers have a lot to explore when starting working with it, while advanced programmers have always something new to learn, as there are numerous supported programming aspects. One of them, is the capability to write code using Blocks.


Blocks do not consist of a new programming discovery in Objective-C. They exist in other programming languages too (such as Javascript) with other names, such as Closures. In iOS, they first-appeared in version 4.0, and since then they’ve known great acceptance and usage. In subsequent iOS versions, Apple re-wrote or updated many framework methods so they adopt blocks, and it seems that blocks are going to be partly the future of the way code is written. But what are they all about really?

Using Text Kit to Manage Text in Your iOS Apps

iOS 7 brings along new rules and new Human Interface Guidelines (HIG) that should be followed by all developers. One of those guidelines regarding the all brand-new look and feel, highlights the fact that an application’s interface should not compete with the content, nor distracting users from it, but supporting it in the best possible way. This fact is called deference and, along with some more new HI guidelines, makes clear that Apple with iOS 7 focuses on the content and on the way it’s presented. This is more apparent if we consider the flatten, simple and uncluttered UI, full of white space that makes more room for the content to be displayed. Thankfully, Apple supports developers in their effort to give prominence to their app content, and to text content especially, by introducing a new tool, named Text Kit.